ACSS2019 Overview


Conference Theme: "Independence & Interdependence"

May 20-22, 2019 | Toshi Center, Tokyo, Japan

The technological and logistical advances of globalisation have enabled us to become independent and empowered as never before, but at the same time made us more dependent on the very things allowing autonomy. While technologies allow us to communicate with those on the other side of the world, they can also make us detached from those immediately around us, and in some cases alienated, or lonely. And yet this increased interconnectedness offers great opportunities to work together to solve some of the world’s most pressing issues, and reminds us of our responsibilities towards each other. Our independence is contextualised in the relations we enjoy with others; in our families and communities, shared institutions, in our wider societies, geographical and political entities, and finally as a part of the one world we all share.

The conference theme for ACSS2019 is Independence & Interdependence, and we hope and expect this important thematic lens to encourage wide reflections on the importance and interrelation of such concepts as autonomy and identity, rights and responsibilities, and power and control; and within a variety of contexts from politics and geopolitics to energy, sustainability and the environment; and from education, technology and logistics, to culture and language; from psychology and security, to considerations of equity and justice.

ACSS is organised by IAFOR in association with the IAFOR Research Centre at the Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) in Osaka University, Japan.

Back to Top


Conference Report

Above left: Dr Eddie Bruce-Jones, of Birkbeck, University of London, UK, gave an interesting Keynote on the history of forced migration, focusing on those brought from South Asia to the Caribbean. Above right: Mr Kotaro Katsuki of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, who oversees the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) of the Japanese government domestically and internationally, delivered a very insightful Keynote on the country’s early steps to implement the SDG’s as agreed by the international community through the United Nations.


Above left to right: Toshi Nakamura, founder and CEO of Kopernik, an Indonesia-based non-profit, shared the real-world experiences of a development agency and the challenges they face in his presentation. Professor Osamu Arakaki, of International Christian University (ICU), Japan, explained how his university is helping Syrian refugees access education through a scholarship programme. Continuing on the theme of Independence and Interdependence, Lowell Sheppard, of HOPE International, Japan, talked about his experiences leading a development agency in Asia. Dr James W. McNally of the University of Michigan, USA and NACDA Program on Aging, and IAFOR Vice-President (Social Sciences and Sustainability), spoke on the challenges brought on by an aging population, including the importance of respecting the needs of the aging themselves.

Back to Top


Speakers

  • Osamu Arakaki
    Osamu Arakaki
    International Christian University, Japan
  • Eddie Bruce-Jones
    Eddie Bruce-Jones
    Birkbeck College School of Law, University of London, UK
  • Kotaro Katsuki
    Kotaro Katsuki
    Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan
  • Kathryn M. Lavender
    Kathryn M. Lavender
    National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA)
  • James W. McNally
    James W. McNally
    University of Michigan, USA & NACDA Program on Aging
  • Toshi Nakamura
    Toshi Nakamura
    Co-Founder & CEO, Kopernik
  • Lowell Sheppard
    Lowell Sheppard
    HOPE International Development Agency, Japan

Back to Top


Programme

  • Independence and Interdependence: Preliminary Thoughts from the Viewpoint of Japan’s Experience on SDGs Implementation
    Independence and Interdependence: Preliminary Thoughts from the Viewpoint of Japan’s Experience on SDGs Implementation
    Keynote Presentation: Kotaro Katsuki
  • South Asian Indenture to Jamaica: Between Law, Literature and Social Science
    South Asian Indenture to Jamaica: Between Law, Literature and Social Science
    Keynote Presentation: Eddie Bruce-Jones
  • Independence and Interdependence – Perspectives from a Development Practitioner Based in Indonesia
    Independence and Interdependence – Perspectives from a Development Practitioner Based in Indonesia
    Keynote Presentation: Toshi Nakamura
  • What Role Should Japanese Universities Play in the Refugee Crisis?
    What Role Should Japanese Universities Play in the Refugee Crisis?
    Keynote Presentation: Osamu Arakaki
  • Defining and Measuring Resilience in an Aging World
    Defining and Measuring Resilience in an Aging World
    Featured Presentation: James W. McNally
  • Locating Data for Research: Data Collections and Resources for Thesis Writing, Teaching, and Grant Development for the Social Sciences and the Environment
    Locating Data for Research: Data Collections and Resources for Thesis Writing, Teaching, and Grant Development for the Social Sciences and the Environment
    Featured Workshop Presentation: James W McNally & Kathryn Lavender
  • Independence and Interdependence – A Personal Perspective
    Independence and Interdependence – A Personal Perspective
    Featured Presentation: Lowell Sheppard

Back to Top


Organising Committee

The Organising Committee of The Asian Conference on the Social Sciences (ACSS) is composed of distinguished academics who are experts in their fields. Organising Committee members may also be members of IAFOR's International Academic Advisory Board. The Organising Committee is responsible for nominating and vetting Keynote and Featured Speakers; developing the conference programme, including special workshops, panels, targeted sessions, and so forth; event outreach and promotion; recommending and attracting future Organising Committee members; working with IAFOR to select PhD students and early career academics for IAFOR-funded grants and scholarships; and overseeing the reviewing of abstracts submitted to the conference.

  • Joseph Haldane
    Joseph Haldane
    The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan
  • Hiroshi Ishida
    Hiroshi Ishida
    University of Tokyo, Japan
  • James W. McNally
    James W. McNally
    University of Michigan, USA & NACDA Program on Aging
  • Sela V. Panapasa
    Sela V. Panapasa
    University of Michigan, USA
  • Haruko Satoh
    Haruko Satoh
    Osaka University, Japan

Back to Top


IAFOR Research Centre (IRC) – “Innovation and Value Initiative”

The IAFOR Research Centre (IRC) is housed within Osaka University’s School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), and in June 2018 the IRC began an ambitious new “Innovation and Value Initiative”. Officially launched at the United Nations in a special UN-IAFOR Collaborative Session, the initiative seeks to bring together the best in interdisciplinary research around the concept of value, on how value can be recognised, and measured, and how this can help us address issues and solve problems, from the local to the global.

Back to Top

Osamu Arakaki
International Christian University, Japan

Biography

Osamu Arakaki is a professor at International Christian University (ICU), Japan, and an expert of international law and international relations. He received a PhD in Law from Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, an MA in Political Science from the University of Toronto, Canada, and an MA in Law from Meiji Gakuin University, Japan. Before he began serving at ICU, he was a visiting fellow at Harvard Law School, USA, visiting associate professor at the University of Tokyo, Japan, and professor at Hiroshima City University, Japan. His main works include Refugee Law and Practice in Japan (Ashgate, 2008), “Non-state actors and UNHCR’s supervisory role in international relations,” in James C Simeon (ed.), The UNHCR and the Supervision of International Refugee Law (Cambridge University Press, 2013) and Statelessness Conventions and Japanese Laws: Convergence and Divergence (UNHCR Representation in Japan, 2015).

Keynote Presentation (2019) | What Role Should Japanese Universities Play in the Refugee Crisis?
Eddie Bruce-Jones
Birkbeck College School of Law, University of London, UK

Biography

Eddie Bruce-Jones (DPhil, Berlin; LLM, KCL; JD, Columbia; MA, Berlin; AB, Harvard) is Deputy Dean and Reader (Associate Professor) in Law & Anthropology at Birkbeck College School of Law, University of London, where he teaches and researches in the areas of human rights, European law, legal theory, equality law and legal anthropology. He is author of Race in the Shadow of Law: State Violence in Contemporary Europe (Routledge, 2016), and co-author of the forthcoming Anti-Discrimination Law: Texts, Cases and Materials, 3rd Edition (with Aileen McColgan, Hart, 2019). His scholarly writing can be found in the Columbia Human Rights Law Review, Race & Class and the UCLA Journal of International Law and Foreign Affairs. He is currently writing his second book tentatively titled Kaala Paani: Law, Imagination and Colonial Indenture, for which he was a research fellow at the Max Planck Institute for European Legal History in Frankfurt, Germany. He is a member of the New York Bar and an Associate Academic Fellow of the Honourable Society of the Inner Temple. He serves on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Asylum, Immigration and Nationality Law, the Board of Trustees of the UK Lesbian and Gay Immigration Group and the Board of Directors of the Institute of Race Relations (London) and the advisory board of the Centre for Intersectional Justice (Berlin).

Keynote Presentation (2019) | South Asian Indenture to Jamaica: Between Law, Literature and Social Science
Kotaro Katsuki
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan

Biography

Kotaro Katsuki is the Director of the Global Issues Cooperation Division of the International Cooperation Bureau at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan, where he is responsible for the overall coordination of implementing the Japanese Government’s activities related to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) both domestically and internationally.

Mr Katsuki joined the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in 1994. Before commencing his current position, he held various appointments including First Secretary at the Embassy of Japan in the United States, Counsellor at the Embassy of Japan in the People’s Republic of China and Director of Southeast Asia Economic Partnership Division.

He holds a BA in Law from the University of Tokyo and an MA in Regional Studies East Asia from Harvard University. He has lectured at various universities including, for four-and-a-half years, as a part time lecturer at the Faculty of Law at Chuo University.

Keynote Presentation (2019) | Independence and Interdependence: Preliminary Thoughts from the Viewpoint of Japan’s Experience on SDGs implementation
Kathryn M. Lavender
National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA)

Biography

Kathryn joined the National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA) team in November 2017 as project manager. She is involved with day to day operations including data deposits, restricted-use data agreements, data user requests, as well as long-term planning of NACDA activities in the research community.

Before transitioning to NACDA, Kathryn Lavender came to ICPSR from UofM Dearborn as a co-op student, and accepted a full-time position after graduating with her degree in economics. She has been involved in many areas of ICPSR, from curating data across different projects and supervising curation staff to event planning with the summer internship program. As of this April, Kathryn has been an official ICPSR staff member for 10 years.

Featured Workshop Presentation (2019) | Locating Data for Research: Data Collections and Resources for Thesis Writing, Teaching, and Grant Development for the Social Sciences and the Environment

Previous Presentations

Featured Workshop Presentation (2018) | Locating Data for Research

This presentation was co-sponsored by IAFOR and The University of Michigan

James W. McNally
University of Michigan, USA & NACDA Program on Aging

Biography

Dr James W. McNally is the Director of the NACDA Program on Aging, a data archive containing over 1,500 studies related to health and the aging lifecourse. He currently does methodological research on the improvement and enhancement of secondary research data and has been cited as an expert authority on data imputation. Dr McNally has directed the NACDA Program on Aging since 1998 and has seen the archive significantly increase its holdings with a growing collection of seminal studies on the aging lifecourse, health, retirement and international aspects of aging. He has spent much of his career addressing methodological issues with a specific focus on specialized application of incomplete or deficient data and the enhancement of secondary data for research applications. Dr McNally has also worked extensively on issues related to international aging and changing perspectives on the role of family support in the later stages of the aging lifecourse.

Featured Presentation (2019) | Defining and Measuring Resilience in an Aging World
Featured Workshop Presentation (2019) | Locating Data for Research: Data Collections and Resources for Thesis Writing, Teaching, and Grant Development for the Social Sciences and the Environment

Previous Presentations

Featured Panel Presentation (2018) | Health Across the Lifecourse
Featured Workshop Presentation (2018) | Locating Data for Research
Featured Presentation (2017) | Methodologies for the Collection of Comparative Community Level Public Health Data: Obtaining Powerful and Statistically Meaningful Findings for Small Populations
Featured Panel Presentation (2017) | Easts Meets West – Healthy, Active and Beautiful Aging in Asia
Toshi Nakamura
Co-Founder & CEO, Kopernik

Biography

Toshi, together with his wife Ewa Wojkowska, co-founded Kopernik in 2010 with a vision to make international development more effective. Before starting Kopernik, Toshi dealt with governance reform, peace building processes, monitoring and evaluation, and post-disaster reconstruction at the United Nations (UN) in Timor-Leste, Indonesia, Sierra Leone, the United States and Switzerland.

Prior to joining the UN, Toshi was a management consultant for McKinsey and Company in Tokyo. He holds an LLB from Kyoto University and MSc Comparative Politics from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and is a Guest Professor at Osaka University's Center for the Study of Co*Design, Osaka University. Toshi was selected as a World Economic Forum (WEF) Young Global Leader in 2012, and was a member of the WEF Global Agenda Council on Sustainable Development 2014-2016.

Keynote Presentation (2019) | Independence and Interdependence – Perspectives from a Development Practitioner Based in Indonesia
Lowell Sheppard
HOPE International Development Agency, Japan

Biography

Lowell Sheppard is an author, speaker, social entrepreneur, former minister, fellow of the Royal Geographic Society, husband, father, long-distance cyclist, and aspiring sailor. Lowell has spent his entire adult life working with established non-government organisations (also known as non-profit societies) and in several NGO start-ups. As Founder of HOPE International Development Agency Japan and Asia Pacific twenty years ago, Lowell has seen the growth of HOPE to be in the top 2% of charitable organisations in Japan with the coveted “nintei” certified tax-deductible status.

Lowell has served for the last twenty years as an informal advisor to companies and boards in the area of ethical decision making and thought leadership with a focus on community legacy. He has dedicated much of his life to social and environmental improvement projects.

While continuing as Asia Pacific Director for HOPE International Development Agency, in 2020 Lowell is launching an Education Initiative called Navigate22, with a focus on Thought Leadership in the area of Ethics, and Sustainable Goal Setting. Pacific Solo is a 5-year initiative within Navgate22.

Over the coming years, Lowell will prepare himself for the biggest challenge of his life: a solo journey across the North Pacific by the time he’s reached 70 years of age. Sailing from Tokyo to Vancouver, Lowell will navigate through the Pacific garbage patch to mourn the human impact on our planet and contemplate the beauty and resiliency of our world.

The project accompanies Navigate22, an ethics consulting company founded by Lowell in 2019. Pacific Solo will serve as a motif for exploration, sustainability, goal setting, and achievement.

Featured Presentation (2019) | Independence and Interdependence – A Personal Perspective
Independence and Interdependence: Preliminary Thoughts from the Viewpoint of Japan’s Experience on SDGs Implementation
Keynote Presentation: Kotaro Katsuki

The introduction of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in autumn of 2015 reflects the current situation regarding our societies both domestically and internationally. The presentation will attempt to provide an overview of the historical context that led to the adoption of the SDGs, and to shed light on one of the key features, partnership, and share with the audience the Government of Japan’s efforts to promote the agenda, with concrete examples of cooperation with various stakeholders in Japan.

Read presenter biographies.

South Asian Indenture to Jamaica: Between Law, Literature and Social Science
Keynote Presentation: Eddie Bruce-Jones

The 100th anniversary of the abolition of British indentureship in 2017 marked a renaissance of governmental, civil-society and scholarly activity on the legacy of indentureship. The indentureship system sent over one million Indian and Chinese labourers to the Caribbean and other British colonial territories between 1845 and 1917. However, there is a great deal of scholarly work yet to be done on this important social, political and economic system of labour relations.

The work required to fully understand and critically interrogate the indenture system and its significance both to the nation-building project of empire as well as the interior lives of the indentured labourers and their descendants, is by its very nature, interdisciplinary. It involves examination of the legal and administrative structures that enabled the indenture system to emerge in the orbit of the transatlantic slave system. It also requires a close look at the literature written by descendants of indentured labourers, which allows a window into the effects of the system on the material conditions and identity of a significant part of the South Asian diaspora. Finally, a look at the archival records from the era, including for example indentures, colonial planning records and correspondence on mortality rates during the transport, allows critical historians to ask questions that demand imaginative interpretive inquiry.

This lecture outlines an ongoing project that explores the relationship between the lifeways of indentured labourers through literature and archival records. The project interrogates the relationship between the various legal frameworks mobilised by the indenture contracts in the regulation of everyday lives of labourers, including immigration law, private contract law, criminal law, labour law, and family law. This aspect of the project is relevant to legal theorists and legal historians and helps situate indentureship as a legal form in the context of the British colonial era. The project suggests ways in which diasporic imaginings of indenture contest the temporal and spatial rigidity of conventional legal historical narratives.

Read presenter biographies.

Image: "Newly arrived indentured labourers from India in Trinidad" (1897) | Wikipedia

Independence and Interdependence – Perspectives from a Development Practitioner Based in Indonesia
Keynote Presentation: Toshi Nakamura

While Southeast Asia is growing fast and has a booming middle class, there are still a large number of populations living in poverty. Kopernik, a social purpose organization founded in 2010 in Indonesia, is bringing innovative solutions to reduce poverty in Indonesia and neighbouring countries. The speaker will share his journey in establishing Kopernik, and talk about the approaches Kopernik takes in testing simple solutions in a lean way. He will also share his perspectives on how governments, companies, academics and non profits play important roles in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.

Read presenter biographies.

What Role Should Japanese Universities Play in the Refugee Crisis?
Keynote Presentation: Osamu Arakaki

Although the history of asylum is long, the refugee regime was formally created after the First World War. The regime was reshaped during the Cold War. It was an attempt to incorporate the refugee problem into the context of international politics. However, we are witnessing various challenges and hurdles in dealing with new issues within the framework of the regime. Based on this general background, this presentation will discuss what Japan has experienced as a state party to the 1951 Refugee Convention. Then, it will focus on the role of Japanese institutions of higher education and research, that is to say, universities, in light of recent movements represented by the New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants and the Global Compact on Refugees.

Read presenter biographies.

Defining and Measuring Resilience in an Aging World
Featured Presentation: James W. McNally

Much research and policy develop seeks to address the challenge of an “Aging World”. This is a misplaced concern as we are already living in an “Older World” where the population fifty-five and older has been playing an increasing role in the structures and behaviors of world populations for decades. This presentation focuses on how elders are showing increased resilience in the face of the physical, emotional and economic changes that are part of growing older and aging successfully. The presentation will review new findings and research that emphasizes the manner in which elders are adapting to living longer and how we are seeing a healthier and more successful cohort of older individuals. The presentation will look at issues such as aging in place, innovative treatments for chronic conditions and the problems associated with life extension as a goal as opposed to increased quality of life. The presentation will seek to summarize many of the themes and approaches offered as part of the AGEN19 meetings and make suggestions for new lines of inquiry.

Read presenter biographies.

Locating Data for Research: Data Collections and Resources for Thesis Writing, Teaching, and Grant Development for the Social Sciences and the Environment
Featured Workshop Presentation: James W McNally & Kathryn Lavender

Instructors

James W McNally, Director, NACDA Program on Aging
Kathryn Lavender, Program Manager, NACDA Program on Aging

Researchers increasingly recognize the value of public use data for secondary research, thesis development, training and education and the development of independent research grants. As cutting edge international studies are emerging across Asia, Latin America, Europe, and increasingly Africa the opportunities for cross-national and comparative research are growing exponentially. This is a particularly exciting time to work, due to the large number of trained research professionals working within their home countries and providing culturally grounded interpretations of results. An ongoing barrier, however, is knowing where and what kind of data are available for secondary analysis.

The creation and maintenance of sustainable data archives can be challenging but it offers clear advantages for a national and international research strategy. Data that is preserved can be used by multiple researchers, testing a variety of hypotheses and increasing the return on investment to the expensive process of data collection. Having an internally managed archival system also provides greater control and autonomy in the equitable distribution of data resources. This workshop, sponsored by IAFOR and the National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA) will offer hands-on examples of how to discover data resources, obtain them and then implement them as part of a research strategy. Regardless of whether or not you are a student looking for a thesis topic, an instructor looking for research material to using classroom teaching, or an established researcher looking for new opportunities the wealth of publicly available data has created almost unlimited opportunities to explore new themes and to collaborate with other researchers worldwide. NACDA has been in existence for over 35 years, and its preserves and really distributes over 1,500 studies on the lifecourse and health in the United States and worldwide. Funded by the National Institute on Aging in the United States, NACDA represents one of the world’s largest collections of research data. NACDA is only one of many such organizations, and increasingly these data resources can be found, if not in your home country then only a click away via the Internet.

The workshop will introduce you to NACDA and are many research partners across the world. All researchers attending The Asian Conference on Aging & Gerontology 2019 (AGen2019), The Asian Conference on the Social Sciences 2019 (ACSS2019) or The Asian Conference on Sustainability, Energy & the Environment 2019 (ACSEE2019) are welcome to participate in this workshop, ask questions and learn about data resources you can use for research, classroom instruction or in developing a research paper or thesis for your college classes. All you need is your laptop or mobile device and our instructors will help you better understand the wealth of information that lies at your fingertips.

An IAFOR Workshop in collaboration with the University of Michigan

Read presenter biographies.

Independence and Interdependence – A Personal Perspective
Featured Presentation: Lowell Sheppard

Lowell Sheppard will bring a personal perspective to the theme of “Independence and Interdependence” and offer personal accounts, stories, and examples of how communities have survived stress and disaster by fostering independence through interdependence. For example, he will tell how the role of the Tsunami Stones illustrate interdependence through time. He will also explore what true independence and self reliance are, which will be themes of his solo crossing of the Pacific.

Read presenter biographies.

Joseph Haldane
The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan

Biography

Joseph Haldane is the Chairman and CEO of IAFOR. He is responsible for devising strategy, setting policies, forging institutional partnerships, implementing projects, and overseeing the organisation’s business and academic operations, including research, publications and events.

Dr Haldane holds a PhD from the University of London in 19th-century French Studies, and has had full-time faculty positions at the University of Paris XII Paris-Est Créteil (France), Sciences Po Paris (France), and Nagoya University of Commerce and Business (Japan), as well as visiting positions at the French Press Institute in the University of Paris II Panthéon-Assas (France), The School of Journalism at Sciences Po Paris (France), and the School of Journalism at Moscow State University (Russia).

Dr Haldane’s current research concentrates on post-war and contemporary politics and international affairs, and since 2015 he has been a Guest Professor at The Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) at Osaka University, where he teaches on the postgraduate Global Governance Course, and Co-Director of the OSIPP-IAFOR Research Centre, an interdisciplinary think tank situated within Osaka University.

A Member of the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network for Global Governance, Dr Haldane is also a Visiting Professor in the Faculty of Philology at the University of Belgrade (Serbia), a Visiting Professor at the School of Business at Doshisha University (Japan), and a Member of the International Advisory Council of the Department of Educational Foundations at the College of Education of the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa (USA).

From 2012 to 2014, Dr Haldane served as Treasurer of the American Chamber of Commerce in Japan (Chubu Region) and he is currently a Trustee of the HOPE International Development Agency (Japan). He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society in 2012, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts in 2015.

Hiroshi Ishida
University of Tokyo, Japan

Biography

Hiroshi Ishida is Professor of Sociology at the Institute of Social Sciences, University of Tokyo. He served as the Director of the Institute of Social Sciences and the Director of the Center of Social Research and Data Archives, at the University of Tokyo, from 2012 to 2015. He received his PhD in sociology from Harvard University, conducted post-doctoral research at Nuffield College and St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford, and held positions of Assistant and Associate Professor of Sociology at Columbia University. He was a Visiting Professor of Sociology at the University of Michigan and a Visiting Fellow of Sociology at Yale University.

Professor Ishida’s research interests include comparative social stratification and mobility, school-to-work transition, and social inequality over the life course. He is the author of Social Mobility in Contemporary Japan (Stanford University Press) and the co-editor with David Slater of Social Class in Contemporary Japan (Routledge). His work has been published in a number of journals and edited volumes, including American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, British Journal of Sociology, European Sociological Review, and Japanese Sociological Review.

Professor Ishida was the president of the Japanese Association of Mathematical Sociology from 2011 to 2013, and currently serves as the secretary/treasurer of the Research Committee on Social Stratification of the International Sociological Association. From 2005 to 2010, he was the editor-in-chief of Social Science Japan Journal, an international journal on social science research on Japan published by Oxford University Press. He is the principal investigator of the Japanese Life Course Panel Surveys, funded by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. He presently serves on the international editorial board of several journals, including British Journal of Sociology, European Sociological Review, and Social Forces. He is currently the Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) Official Representative for the University of Tokyo.

Featured Panel Presentation (2018) | Health Across the Lifecourse

Previous Presentations

Featured Panel Presentation (2017) | Easts Meets West – Healthy, Active and Beautiful Aging in Asia
James W. McNally
University of Michigan, USA & NACDA Program on Aging

Biography

Dr James W. McNally is the Director of the NACDA Program on Aging, a data archive containing over 1,500 studies related to health and the aging lifecourse. He currently does methodological research on the improvement and enhancement of secondary research data and has been cited as an expert authority on data imputation. Dr McNally has directed the NACDA Program on Aging since 1998 and has seen the archive significantly increase its holdings with a growing collection of seminal studies on the aging lifecourse, health, retirement and international aspects of aging. He has spent much of his career addressing methodological issues with a specific focus on specialized application of incomplete or deficient data and the enhancement of secondary data for research applications. Dr McNally has also worked extensively on issues related to international aging and changing perspectives on the role of family support in the later stages of the aging lifecourse.

Featured Presentation (2019) | Defining and Measuring Resilience in an Aging World
Featured Workshop Presentation (2019) | Locating Data for Research: Data Collections and Resources for Thesis Writing, Teaching, and Grant Development for the Social Sciences and the Environment

Previous Presentations

Featured Panel Presentation (2018) | Health Across the Lifecourse
Featured Workshop Presentation (2018) | Locating Data for Research
Featured Presentation (2017) | Methodologies for the Collection of Comparative Community Level Public Health Data: Obtaining Powerful and Statistically Meaningful Findings for Small Populations
Featured Panel Presentation (2017) | Easts Meets West – Healthy, Active and Beautiful Aging in Asia
Sela V. Panapasa
University of Michigan, USA

Biography

Dr Sela V. Panapasa studies family support and intergenerational exchanges among aged Pacific Islanders living in the US and Pacific region. Her work examines changes in elderly living arrangements and headship status in response to demographic and socioeconomic change. Her interests include family demography, race and ethnicity, measuring health disparities and comparative studies.

Featured Presentation (2018) | Presentation details will be announced here shortly

Previous IAFOR Presentations

Featured Presentation (ACE2017) | Teaching Health Equity at the Community Level: Engaging Faith Based Organizations in Teaching Community Based Nutritional and Health Behaviors
Haruko Satoh
Osaka University, Japan

Biography

Haruko Satoh is Specially Appointed Professor at the Graduate School of Engineering Science in charge of CAREN (Osaka University Centre for the Advancement of Research and Education Exchange Networks in Asia) and also lecturer at the Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), where she runs MEXT Reinventing Japan project on “Peace and Human Security in Asia (PAHSA)” with six Southeast Asian and four Japanese universities. She is also the President of the The Asian Political and International Studies Association (APISA).

In the past she has worked at the Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA), Chatham House, and Gaiko Forum. Her interests are primarily in state theory, Japanese nationalism and identity politics. Recent publications include: “Rethinking Security in Japan: In Search of a Post-‘Postwar’ Narrative” in Jain & Lam (eds), Japan’s Strategic Challenges in a Changing Regional Environment (World Scientific, 2012); “Through the Looking-glass: China’s Rise as Seen from Japan”, (co-authored with Toshiya Hoshino), Journal of Asian Public Policy, Vol. 5, No. 2, pp. 181-198 (July 2012); “Post-3.11 Japan: A Matter of Restoring Trust?”, ISPI Analysis No. 83 (December 2011); “Legitimacy Deficit in Japan: The Road to True Popular Sovereignty” in Kane, Loy & Patapan (eds), Political Legitimacy in Asia: New Leadership Challenges (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), “Japan: Re-engaging with China Meaningfully” in Tang, Li & Acharya (eds), Living with China: Regional States and China through Crises and Turning Points, (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009).

Professor Haruko Satoh is a member of IAFOR’s Academic Governing Board. She is Chair of the Politics, Law & International Relations section of the International Academic Advisory Board.


Previous Presentations

Featured Panel Presentation (2017) | East Meets West